Category Archives: Domain Expeditionary Force

RESCUE MISSION

“Airl says that even though The Domain has located all of the Lost Battalion officers and crew, the success of freeing them depends on the IS-BEs who are already on Earth. The Domain Central Command cannot authorize any personnel or resources, at this time, to conduct a “rescue mission” as this in not the primary mission of The Domain  Expeditionary Force in this galaxy.

So, if IS-BEs on Earth are going to escape from this prison, it will have to be an “inside job”, so to speak.  The inmates will have to figure out how to get themselves out.  Various methods of recovering the memory and ability of IS-BEs have been developed over the past 10,000 years on Earth, but none have proven to be consistently effective so far.

Airl mentioned that the most significant breakthrough was made by Gautama Siddhartha about 2,500 years ago. However, the original teachings and techniques taught by The Buddha have been altered or lost over the millennia since then.  The practical techniques of his philosophy were perverted into robotic religious rituals by priests as a self-serving instrument of control or slavery.

However, another major advance occurred recently. An acquaintance of The Commanding Officer of The Domain Expeditionary Force Space Station is an IS-BE who had once been an important engineer and officer in the “Old Empire” Space Fleet.  He become an “untouchable” himself about 10,000 years ago and was sentenced to Earth for leading a mutiny against the oppressive regime of the “Old Empire”.  The engineer was trained in Advanced Scientific Improvisation Theory thousands of years ago.  This man has applied his expertise to helping The Domain solve the apparently unsolvable problem of rescuing the members of the Lost Battalion, as well as the IS-BEs on Earth.

Careful observation and experimental analysis of the mechanics of memory in IS-BEs by he and his wife, who assisted him, led to the realization that IS-BEs can recover from amnesia and also regain lost abilities.  Together they discovered and developed effective methods that they used to rehabilitate their own memories.  They eventually codified their methods so that others can safely be trained to apply them to themselves and others, without detection by the “Old Empire” thought control operators.

Their research also revealed that IS-BEs can occupy and operate more than one body at the same time —  a fact that previously was thought to be uniquely  limited to officers of The Domain. One example of this fact is that the engineer, in a previous lifetime on Earth, was Suleiman The Magnificent [i] (Footnote). His assistant was a harem girl who rose up from slavery to become his wife and rule the Ottoman empire with him. [ii] (Footnote) Simultaneously, she inhabited another body and ruled her own empire as Queen Elizabeth. [iii] (Footnote) As the Queen of England, she never married, because she was already married to the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire!”

— Excerpt from the Top Secret US Air Force transcripts from Roswell, NM recorded in July – August, 1947 and published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW in 2009, Edited by Lawrence R. Spencer.


FOOTNOTES:

[i] “… Suleiman the Magnificent…”

“Suleiman I (Ottoman Turkish: سليمان Sulaymān, Turkish: Süleyman; almost always Kanuni Sultan Süleyman in Turkish) (November 6, 1494 – September 5/6, 1566), was the tenth and longest-reigning Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, from 1520 to his death in 1566. He is known in the West as Suleiman the Magnificent and in the East, as the Lawgiver (in Turkish Kanuni; Arabic: القانونى‎, alQānūnī), for his complete reconstruction of the Ottoman legal system. Suleiman became the pre-eminent monarch of 16th century Europe, presiding over the apex of the Ottoman Empire’s military, political and economic power. Suleiman personally led Ottoman armies to conquer the Christian strongholds of Belgrade, Rhodes, and most of Hungary before his conquests were checked at the Siege of Vienna in 1529. He annexed most of the Middle East in his conflict with the Persians and large swathes of North Africa as far west as Algeria. Under his rule, the Ottoman fleet dominated the seas from the Mediterranean to the Indian Ocean.

At the helm of an expanding empire, Suleiman personally instituted legislative changes relating to society, education, taxation, and criminal law. His canonical law (or the Kanuns) fixed the form of the empire for centuries after his death. Not only was Suleiman a distinguished poet and goldsmith in his own right; he also became a great patron of culture, overseeing the golden age of the Ottoman Empire’s artistic, literary and architectural development.

In a break with Ottoman tradition, Suleiman married a harem girl who became Hürrem Sultan, whose intrigues in the court and power over the Sultan have become as famous as Suleiman himself.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[ii] “… His assistant was a harem girl who rose up from slavery to become his wife…”

” According to late sixteenth century and early seventeenth century sources such as the Polish poet Samuel Twardowski, she was born in the town which was then part of the Kingdom of Poland. She was captured by Crimean Tatars during one of their frequent raids into this region and taken as a slave, probably first to the Crimean city of Kaffa, a major centre of the slave trade, then to Istanbul, and was selected for Süleyman’s harem.

Suleiman was infatuated with Hurrem Sultan, a harem girl of Ruthenian origin. In the West foreign diplomats, taking notice of the palace gossip about her, called her “Russelazie” or “Roxolana“, referring to her Slavic origins. The daughter of an Orthodox Ukrainian priest, she was captured and rose through the ranks of the Harem to become Suleiman’s favorite. Breaking with two centuries of Ottoman tradition, a former concubine had thus become the legal wife of the Sultan, much to the astonishment of observers in the palace and the city. He also allowed Hurrem Sultan to remain with him at court for the rest of her life, breaking another tradition—that when imperial heirs came of age, they would be sent along with the imperial concubine who bore them to govern remote provinces of the Empire, never to return unless their progeny succeeded to the throne.

Under his pen name, Muhibbi, Suleiman composed this poem for Roxolana:

“Throne of my lonely niche, my wealth, my love, my moonlight.
My most sincere friend, my confidant, my very existence, my Sultan, my one and only love.
The most beautiful among the beautiful…
My springtime, my merry faced love, my daytime, my sweetheart, laughing leaf…
My plants, my sweet, my rose, the one only who does not distress me in this world…
My Istanbul, my Caraman, the earth of my Anatolia
My Badakhshan, my Baghdad and Khorasan
My woman of the beautiful hair, my love of the slanted brow, my love of eyes full of mischief…
I’ll sing your praises always
I, lover of the tormented heart, Muhibbi of the eyes full of tears, I am happy.”

Roxelana, as she is better known in Europe, is well-known both in modern Turkey and in the West, and is the subject of many artistic works. She has inspired paintings, musical works (including Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 63), an opera by Denys Sichynsky, a ballet, plays, and several novels.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[iii] “… Queen Elizabeth…”

Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana, The Faerie Queen or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor dynasty. The daughter of Henry VIII, she was born a princess, but her mother, Anne Boleyn, was executed three years after her birth, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Perhaps for that reason, her brother, Edward VI, cut her out of the succession. His will, however, was set aside, as it contravened the Third Succession Act of 1543, in which Elizabeth was named as successor provided that Mary I of England, Elizabeth’s half-sister, should die without issue. In 1558, Elizabeth succeeded her half-sister, during whose reign she had been imprisoned for nearly a year on suspicion of supporting Protestant rebels.

Elizabeth set out to rule by good counsel. One of her first moves was to support the establishment of an English Protestant church, of which she became the Supreme Governor. This Elizabethan Religious Settlement held firm throughout her reign and later evolved into today’s Church of England. It was expected that Elizabeth would marry, but despite several petitions from parliament, she never did. The reasons for this choice are unknown, and they have been much debated. As she grew older, Elizabeth became famous for her virginity, and a cult grew up around her which was celebrated in the portraits, pageants and literature of the day.

One of her mottos was video et taceo: “I see, and say nothing”.

This strategy, viewed with impatience by her counselors, often saved her from political and marital misalliances. Though Elizabeth was cautious in foreign affairs and only half-heartedly supported a number of ineffective, poorly resourced military campaigns in the Netherlands, France and Ireland, the defeat of the Spanish armada in 1588 associated her name forever with what is popularly viewed as one of the greatest victories in British history. Within twenty years of her death, she was being celebrated as the ruler of a golden age, an image that retains its hold on the English people. Elizabeth’s reign is known as the Elizabethan era, famous above all for the flourishing of English drama, led by playwrights such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-12-31 00:42:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Aquatic Unit of The Domain Search Party

“The Domain Search Party devised a wide variety of electronic detection devices needed to track the electronic signature or wavelength of each of the missing members of the Battalion.  Some were used in space, others on land, and special devices were invented to detect IS-BEs under water.

One of these electronic detection devices is referred to as a “tree of life”.  [i] (Footnote)  The device is literally a tool designed to detect the presence of life, which is an IS-BE.  This was a large electronic screen generator designed to permeate wide areas.  To the ancient humans on Earth it resembled a sort of tree, since is consists of an interwoven lattice of electronic field generators and receivers.  The electronic field detects the presence of IS-BEs, whether the IS-BE is occupying a body, or if they are outside a body.

A portable version of this detection device was carried by each of the members of The Domain Search Party.  Stone carvings in Sumeria show winged beings using pinecone-shaped instruments to scan the bodies of human beings.  They are also shown carrying the power unit for the scanner which are depicted as stylized baskets or water buckets, being carried by eagle-headed, winged beings. [ii] (Footnote)   

Members of the aerial unit of The Domain Search Party, led by Ahura Mazda, were often called  “winged gods” in human interpretations. Throughout the Persian civilization there are a great many stone relief carvings that depict winged space craft, that they called a “faravahar”. [iii] (Footnote)  

Members of the Aquatic Unit of The Domain Search Party were called “Oannes” by local humans. [iv] (Footnote)   Stone carvings of the so-called Oannes are shown wearing silver diving suits.  They lived in the sea and appeared to the human population to be men dressed to look like fish.  Some members of the lost Battalion were found in the oceans inhabiting the bodies of dolphins or whales. [v] (Footnote)

Excerpt from the Top Secret transcripts published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW.


[i]  “… tree of life….”

“Trees of life appear in folklore, culture and fiction, often relating to immortality. These often hold cultural and religious significance to the peoples for whom they appear.

The Sumerian (or Persian) Tree of Life was represented by a series of nodes and criss-crossing lines. It was an important religious symbol among these peoples, often attended to by Eagle Headed Gods & Priests, or the King himself.

  • In Chinese mythology a carving of a Tree of Life depicts a phoenix and a dragon – in Chinese mythology the dragon often represents immortality. There is also the Taoist story of a tree that produces a peach every three thousand years. The one who eats the fruit receives immortality.
  • An archaeological discovery in the 1990s was of a sacrificial pit at Sanxingdui in Sechuan, China. Dating from about 1200 BCE, it contained 3 bronze trees, one of them 4 meters high. At the base was a dragon, and fruit hanging from the lower branches. At the top is a strange bird-like (phoenix) creature with claws. Also from Sechuan, from the late Han dynasty (c 25 – 220 CE) is another tree of life. The ceramic base is guarded by a horned beast with wings. The leaves of the tree are coins and people.
  • In Egyptian mythology, in the Ennead system of Heliopolis, the first couple, apart from Shu & Tefnut (moisture & dryness) and Geb & Nuit (earth & sky), are Isis & Osiris. They were said to have emerged from the acacia tree of Saosis, which the Egyptians considered the tree of life, referring to it as the “tree in which life and death are enclosed”.
  • The Egyptian’s Holy Sycamore also stood on the threshold of life and death, connecting the two worlds.
  • In Germanic paganism, trees played a prominent role, appearing in various aspects of surviving texts and possibly in the name of gods.
  • The tree of life appears in Norse religion as Yggdrasil, the world tree, a massive tree with extensive lore surrounding it. Perhaps related to the Yggdrasil, accounts have survived of Germanic Tribes honouring sacred trees within their societies.
  • In Norse Mythology it is the golden apples from Iðunn’s tree that provides immortality for the gods.
  • The Tree of Life is mentioned in the Books of Genesis, in which it has the potential to grant immortality to Adam and Eve. (However, it is not immediately obvious, nor is it universally accepted, that the Book of Genesis account and the Book of Revelation account speak of the same Tree of Life.)
  • A Tree of Life, in the form of ten interconnected nodes, is an important part of the Kabbalah.  As such, it resembles the ten Sephirot.
  • The Tree of Life appears in the Book of Mormon in a revelation to Lehi (see 1 Nephi 8:10-12). It is symbolic of the love of God (see 1 Nephi 11:21-23), and sometimes understood as salvation and post-mortal existence.
  • Etz Chaim, Hebrew for “Tree of Life”, is a common term used in Judaism. The expression, found in the Book of Proverbs, is figuratively applied to the Torah itself.
  • Among pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures, the concept of “world trees” is a prevalent motif in Mesoamerican mythical cosmologies and iconography. World trees embodied the four cardinal directions, which represented also the fourfold nature of a central world tree, a symbolic axis mundi connecting the planes of the Underworld and the sky with that of the terrestrial world.
  • Depictions of world trees, both in their      directional and central aspects, are found in the art and mythological traditions of cultures such as the Maya, Aztec,  Izapan,  Mixtec, Olmec, and others, dating to at least the Mid/Late Formative periods of Mesoamerican chronology.
  • Directional world trees are also associated with the four Year bearers in Mesoamerican calendars, and the directional colors and deities.
  • World trees are frequently depicted with birds in their branches, and their roots extending into earth or water (sometimes atop a “water-monster”, symbolic of the underworld).
  • The central world tree has also been interpreted as a representation of the band of the Milky Way. Fragment of a bronze helmet from Urartu, with the “Tree of Life” depicted.
  • In ancient Armrenia around 13th to 6th century BC, the Tree of Life was a religious symbol, drawn onto the exterior walls of fortresses and carved on the armour of warriors. The branches of the tree were equally divided on the right and left sides of the stem, with each branch having one leaf, and one leaf on the apex of the tree. Servants (some winged) stood on each side of the tree with one of their hands up as if they are taking care of it. This tree can be found on numerous Urartu artifacts, such as paintings on the walls of the Erebuni fortress in Yerevan, Armenia.
  • The symbolism of the tree is mentioned in the 135th hymn of the 10th book of Rig-Veda, and in the 15th chapter of Bhagavad-gita (1-4).
  • In the Japanese religion of Shinto, trees were marked with sacred paper symbolizing lightning bolts, as trees were thought to be sacred. This was propagated by the fact that after they passed (died), ancestors and animals were often portrayed as branches on the tree.
  • The Book of One Thousand and One Nights has a story, ‘The Tale of Buluqiya’, in which the      hero searches for immortality and finds a paradise with jewel-encrusted trees. Nearby is a Fountain of Youth guarded by Al-Khidr. Unable to defeat the guard, Buluqiya has to return empty-handed.
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh is a similar quest for immortality. In Mesopotamian mythology, Etana searches for a ‘plant of birth’ to provide him with a son.  This has a solid provenance of antiquity, being found in cylinder seals from Akkad (2390 – 2249 BCE).
  • One of the earliest forms of ancient Greek religion has its origins associated with tree cults.

In mystical traditions of world religions, sacred texts are read for metaphorical content concerning the relationship between states of mind and the external experience of reality. As such, the tree is a manifestation/causal symbol – the Tree of Life representing the coveted state of eternal aliveness or fulfillment, not immortality of the body or soul. In such a state, physical death (which cannot be overcome) is nevertheless a choice, and direct experience of the perfect goodness/divine reality/god is not only possible, but ever present.

Once the ego (surface consciousness) experiences shame, having been tempted to absorb or believe in duality (such as eating of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil), we are protected from living eternally in that limiting, fallen, experience by the cherubim guarding the gate of return to paradise. The cherubim are symbolic of the perfect knowledge of selfor true nature, with the power of purification and return to being.

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[ii]  “… the carvings show cone-shaped instruments, and electronic detection devices which are stylized as baskets or water buckets, being carried by eagle headed, winged beings….”

EDITOR’S NOTE:  Excellent photographs of these can be viewed at the following website:

http://www.crystalinks.com/godswaterbuckets.html

[iii]  “… faravahar…”

“The faravahar or farohar (transliteration varies) is one of the best-known symbols of Zoroastrianism.

The winged disc has a long history in the art and culture of the ancient Near and Middle East. Historically, the symbol is influenced by the “winged sun” hieroglyph appearing on Bronze Age royal seals. While the symbol is currently thought to represent a Fravashi (c. a guardian angel) and from which it derives its name, what it represented in the minds of those who adapted it from earlier Mesopotamian and Egyptian reliefs is unclear. Because the symbol first appears on royal inscriptions, it is also thought to represent the ‘Divine Royal Glory’ (khvarenah), or the Fravashi of the king, or represented the divine mandate that was the foundation of a king’s authority.

This relationship between the name of the symbol and the class of divine entities reflects the current belief that the symbol represents a Fravashi. However, there is no physical description of the Fravashis in the Avesta and in Avestan the entities are grammatically feminine.

Prior to the reign of Darius I, the symbol did not have a human form above the wings. In present-day Zoroastrianism, the faravahar is said to be a reminder of one’s purpose in life, which is to live in such a way that the soul progresses towards frasho-kereti, or union with Ahura Mazda.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[iv] “…Oannes…”

“Oannes was the name given by the Babylonian writer Berossus in the 3rd century BC to a mythical being who taught mankind wisdom. Berossus describes Oannes as having the body of a fish but underneath the figure of a man. He is described as dwelling in the Persian Gulf, and rising out of the waters in the daytime and furnishing mankind instruction in writing, the arts and the various sciences.

Once thought to be based on the ancient Babylonian god Ea, it is now known that Oannes is in fact based on Uan (Adapa) – the first of the seven antediluvian sages or Abgallu (in Sumerian Ab=water, Gal=Great, Lu=man), who were sent by Ea to deliver the arts of civilization to mankind in ancient Sumerian mythology, at Eridu, the oldest city of Sumer.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[v]  “Some members of the lost Battalion have been found in the oceans inhabiting the bodies of dolphins or whales.”

Dolphins have long played a role in human culture. Dolphins are common in Greek mythology and there are many coins from the time which feature a man or boy riding on the back of a dolphin. The Ancient Greeks treated them with welcome; a ship spotting dolphins riding in their wake was considered a good omen for a smooth voyage. Dolphins also seem to have been important to the Minoans, judging by artistic evidence from the ruined palace at Knossos. In Hindu mythology, the Ganges River Dolphin is associated with Ganga, the deity of the Ganges river

Dolphins are often regarded as one of Earth’s most intelligent animals, though it is hard to say just how intelligent dolphins are, as comparisons of species’ relative intelligence are complicated by differences in sensory apparatus, response modes, and nature of cognition. Furthermore, the difficulty and expense of doing experimental work with large aquatics means that some tests which could yield meaningful results still have not been carried out, or have been carried out with inadequate sample size and methodology. Dolphin behavior has been studied extensively by humans however, both in captivity and in the wild.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2012-02-29 01:05:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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THE DOMAIN SEARCH PARTY

“630 BCE —

Zoroaster [i] (Footnote) created religious practices in Persia around an IS-BE called Ahura Mazda. [ii] (Footnote) This was yet another of the growing number of “monotheistic” gods put in place by operatives of The Domain to displace a  panoply of “Old Empire” gods.

Members of the aerial unit of The Domain Search Party, led by Ahura Mazda, were often called  “winged gods” in human interpretations. Throughout the Persian civilization there are a great many stone relief carvings that depict winged space craft, that they called a “faravahar”. [iii] (Footnote)

— Excerpt from the Top Secret transcripts published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW, Edited by Lawrence R. Spencer


FOOTNOTES:

[i] “… faravahar…”

“The faravahar or farohar (transliteration varies) is one of the best-known symbols of Zoroastrianism.

The winged disc has a long history in the art and culture of the ancient Near and Middle East. Historically, the symbol is influenced by the “winged sun” hieroglyph appearing on Bronze Age royal seals. While the symbol is currently thought to represent a Fravashi (c. a guardian angel) and from which it derives its name, what it represented in the minds of those who adapted it from earlier Mesopotamian and Egyptian reliefs is unclear. Because the symbol first appears on royal inscriptions, it is also thought to represent the ‘Divine Royal Glory’ (khvarenah), or the Fravashi of the king, or represented the divine mandate that was the foundation of a king’s authority.

This relationship between the name of the symbol and the class of divine entities reflects the current belief that the symbol represents a Fravashi. However, there is no physical description of the Fravashis in the Avesta and in Avestan the entities are grammatically feminine.

Prior to the reign of Darius I, the symbol did not have a human form above the wings. In present-day Zoroastrianism, the faravahar is said to be a reminder of one’s purpose in life, which is to live in such a way that the soul progresses towards frasho-kereti, or union with Ahura Mazda.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org


[ii] ” Zoroaster…”

Zoroaster, the prophet and poet sees the universe as the cosmic struggle between aša “truth” and druj “lie.” The cardinal concept of aša – which is highly nuanced and only vaguely translatable – is at the foundation of all other Zoroastrian doctrine, including that of Ahura Mazda (who is aša), creation (that is aša), existence (that is aša) and Free Will, which is arguably Zoroaster’s greatest contribution to religious philosophy.  The purpose of humankind, like that of all other creation, is to sustain aša. For humankind, this occurs through active participation in life and the exercise of good thoughts, words and deeds.

The name Zoroaster was famous in classical antiquity, and a number of different Zoroasters – all described as having occult powers – appear in historiographic accounts.

In Pliny’s Natural History, Zoroaster is said to have laughed on the day of his birth. He lived in the wilderness and enjoyed exploring it from a young age. Plutarch compares him with Lycurgus and Numa Pompilius (Numa, 4). Plutarch, drawing partly on Theopompus, speaks of Zoroaster in Isis and Osiris: In this work, the prophet is empowered by trust in his God and the protection of his allies. He faces outward opposition and unbelief, and inward doubt.

The works of Zoroaster had a significant influence on Greek philosophy and Roman philosophy. The ancient Greek writer Eudoxus of Cnidus and the Latin writer Pliny the Elder praised Zoroaster’s philosophy as “the most famous and most useful.” Plato learnt of Zoroaster’s philosophy through Eudoxus and incorporated some of it into his own Platonic realism. In the third century BC, however, Colotes accused Plato’s The Republic of plagiarizing parts of (what is attributed to) Zoroaster’s On Nature, such as the Myth of Er. Plato’s contemporary, Heraclides Ponticus, wrote a text called Zoroaster based on Zoroaster’s philosophy in order to express his disagreement with Plato on natural philosophy.

Zoroaster was mentioned by the nineteenth-century poet William Butler Yeats. His wife and he were said to have claimed to have contacted Zoroaster through “automatic writing.”

The 2005 edition of the Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy places Zoroaster first in a chronology of philosophers.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[iii] “… an IS-BE called Ahura Mazda.”

Ahura Mazda (Ahura Mazdā) is the Avestan language name for a divinity exalted by Zoroaster as the one uncreated Creator, hence God.  He is the nameless “Father Asura”, that is, Varuna of the Rigveda. In this view, Zoroastrian mazda is the equivalent of the Vedic medhira, described in Rigveda 8.6.10 as the “(revealed) insight into the cosmic order”.

Ahura Mazda is seen as the Ahura par excellence, superior to both *vouruna and *mitra, and the nameless “Father Asura” of the Rigveda and is a distinct divinity. The Zoroastrian faith is thus described by its adherents as Mazdayasna, the worship of Mazda. In the Avesta, “Ahura Mazda is the highest object of worship”.

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

 

Originally posted 2011-06-01 10:45:23. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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