Category Archives: Airl

DOMAIN COMMUNICATONS OFFICE

DOMAIN COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE

“Without a defined nomenclature communication was not possible beyond the rudimentary understanding between men and dogs, or between two small children.  The lack of a common vocabulary of clearly defined words that all parties can use fluently, was the limiting factor in communication between all people, groups, or nations. “

_____________________________ 

“Airl continued to stay in communication with the Communications Officer on the asteroid belt space station, from which she received much of this information.  Since Airl was an officer / pilot / engineer of The Domain, and not a historian, she had to get this information from records of reconnaissance missions conducted by other officers of The Domain Expeditionary Force.”

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“However, the following dates and events have been extrapolated from the accumulated information in the data files of The Domain — at least those that are accessible to me through the space station communications center.”

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“The Domain Communications Office has authorized me to provide you with some information in an effort to provide a more accurate and complete understanding of these things and thereby enable you to discover more effective solutions to the unique problems you face on Earth.”

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“The Domain has been able to return some IS-BEs of the Lost Battalion to active duty on a limited, part-time basis.  For example, two young girls who occupy biological bodies on Earth are now, at the same time, working as active members of The Domain Expeditionary Force on the asteroid space station as operators of a communication switchboard. These operators relay messages between The Domain Expeditionary Force and The Domain Command Headquarters.”

“At that time I was a member of a mission sent to investigate the loss of a Domain base located in the Himalaya Mountains.  An entire battalion of officers, pilots, communications and administrative personnel disappeared and the base destroyed.

______________________________

“You and I were unable to communicate in your language because I, personally, have not been exposed to your language. However, now that I have scanned the books and material you provided me this data has been relayed to our space station in this region and processed by our communications officer through our computers.  It has been translated into my own language and relayed back to me in a context that I can think with.  I have also received additional information from the files stored in our computers about the English language and Domain records concerning Earth civilization.”

_________________________________

“Airl described the abilities of an IS-BE officer of The Domain to me, and she demonstrated one to me when she contacted — telepathically — a communications officer of The Domain who is stationed in the asteroid belt. [i] (Footnote)

The asteroid belt is composed of thousands of broken up pieces of a planet that once existed between Mars and Jupiter.  It serves as a good low-gravity jumping off point for incoming space craft traveling toward the center of our galaxy.

She requested that this officer consult information stored in the “files” of The Domain, concerning the history of Earth.  She asked the communications officer to “feed” this information to Airl.  The communications officer immediately complied with the request.  Based on the information stored in the files of The Domain, Airl was able to give me a brief overview or “history lesson”.

— Excerpts from the Top Secret transcripts published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW


[i]  “…asteroid belt…”

“The asteroid belt is the region of the Solar System located roughly between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter. It is occupied by numerous irregularly shaped bodies called asteroids or minor planets. More than half the mass within the main belt is contained in the four largest objects: Ceres, 4 Vesta, 2 Pallas, and 10 Hygiea. All of these have mean diameters of more than 400 km, while Ceres, the main belt’s only dwarf planet, is about 950 km in diameter. The remaining bodies range down to the size of a dust particle. The asteroid material is so thinly distributed that multiple unmanned spacecraft have traversed it without incident.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2013-03-13 18:05:54. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY EDUCATION

“By the 15th day after “rescuing” Airl from the crash site, I was able to communicate fluidly and effortlessly with her in English.  She had absorbed so much written material by this time that her academic education far exceeded my own.  Although I graduated from high school in Los Angeles in 1940 and attended college for four years of premedical and nursing training, the variety of my own reading had been  fairly limited.

I had not studied most of the subjects to which Airl had now been exposed, especially considering her acute understanding, very intense study habits and a nearly photographic memory!  She was able to recall long passages from books she read.  She was especially fond of sections of her favorite stories from classic literature like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn [i] (Footnote), tales from Gulliver’s Travels [ii] (Footnote) and Peter Pan [iii] (Footnote) and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow [iv] (Footnote).

By this time Airl had become the teacher, and I was the student.  I was about to learn what men of Earth do not know and have no way of knowing!

The throng of scientists and agents who observed us through the one-way glass [v] (Footnote) of our interview room, whom Airl and I now referred to as “the gallery”, were growing increasingly impatient to ask her questions.  But Airl continued to refuse to allow any questions to be asked of her by anyone other than myself, even vicariously through me as an interpreter, or in writing.

On the afternoon of the 16th day Airl and I sat next to each other as she read.  She closed the last page of a book she was reading and placed it aside.  I was about to hand her the next book from a large pile waiting to be read, when she turned and said or “thought” to me, “I am ready to speak now”.  At first I was a little confused by the remark.  I gestured for her to continue and she began to teach me my first lesson.”

— Excerpted from the notes provided by Nurse Matilda MacElroy published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW, edited by Lawrence R. Spencer


FOOTNOTES:

[i] “… Adventures of Huckleberry Finn…”

“Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) (often shortened to Huck Finn) by Mark Twain.  The book is noted for its innocent young protagonist, its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River, and its sober and often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. The drifting journey of Huckleberry Finn and his friend, runaway slave Jim, down the Mississippi River on their raft may be one of the most enduring images of escape and freedom in all of American literature.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[ii] “… Gulliver’s Travels …”

“Gulliver’s Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of several Ships, is a novel by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the “travellers’ tales” literary sub-genre. It is Swift’s best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature.  The book became tremendously popular as soon as it was published (John Gay said in a 1726 letter to Swift that “it is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery”), and it is likely that it has never been out of print since then.  The book presents itself as a simple traveller’s narrative with the disingenuous title Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, its authorship assigned only to “Lemuel Gulliver, first a surgeon, then a captain of several ships”.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[iii] “…Peter Pan…”

Peter Pan is a character created by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie (1860–1937). A mischievous boy who flies and magically refuses to grow up, Peter Pan spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on the small island of Neverland as the leader of his gang the Lost Boys, interacting with fairies and pirates, and from time to time meeting ordinary children from the world outside.

Barrie never described Peter’s appearance in detail, leaving much of it to the imagination of the reader and the interpretation of anyone adapting the character. He describes him as a beautiful boy with a beautiful smile, “clad in skeleton leaves and the juices that flow from trees”.

Peter is mainly an exaggerated stereotype of a boastful and careless boy. He is quick to point out how great he is.  Peter has a nonchalant, devil-may-care attitude, and is fearlessly cocky when it comes to putting himself in danger. Barrie writes that when Peter thought he was going to die on Marooner’s Rock, he felt scared, yet he felt only one shudder run through him when any other person would’ve felt scared up until death. With his blissful unawareness of the tragedy of death, he says, “To die will be an awfully big adventure”.

Peter’s archetypal ability is his refusal to grow up. Barrie did not explain how he was able to do this, leaving the implication that it was by an act of will.

Peter is a skilled swordsman, with the skill to rival even Captain Hook, whose hand he cut off in a duel. He has remarkably keen vision and hearing.  Peter Pan is said to be able to do almost anything.   Peter has an effect on the whole of Neverland and its inhabitants when he is there. Barrie states that the island wakes up when he returns from his trip to London.   Peter is the leader of the Lost Boys, a band of boys who were lost by their parents, and came to live in Neverland. He is friends with Tinker Bell, a common fairy who is often jealously protective of him.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[iv] “…The Legend of Sleepy Hollow… ”

“A short story by Washington Irving contained in his collection The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent., written while he was living in Birmingham, England, and first published in 1820. With Irving’s companion piece “Rip Van Winkle”, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” is among the earliest American fiction still read today.

The story is set circa 1790 in the Dutch settlement of Tarry Town, New York, in a secluded glen called Sleepy Hollow. It tells the story of Ichabod Crane, a lanky schoolmaster from Connecticut, who competes with Abraham “Brom Bones” Van Brunt, the town rowdy, for the hand of 18-year-old Katrina Van Tassel, only daughter of a wealthy farmer. As Crane leaves a party at the Van Tassel home on an autumn night, he is pursued by the Headless Horseman, supposedly the ghost of a Hessian trooper who lost his head to a cannonball during “some nameless battle” of the American Revolutionary War and who “rides forth to the scene of battle in nightly quest of his head.” Crane disappears from town, leaving Katrina to marry Brom Bones, who was “to look exceedingly knowing whenever the story of Ichabod was related.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[v] ...one-way glass…”

A two-way mirror, also called a one-way mirror, is a mirror which is partially reflective and partially transparent. It is used with a darkened room on one side and a well-lit room on the other, allowing those in the darkened room to see into the lighted room but not vice versa.

The glass is coated with (or in some cases encases a layer of) a very thin almost transparent layer of metal (generally aluminum). The result is what appears to be a mirror from one side, and tinted glass from the other. A viewer in the brightly lit area has difficulty seeing into the darkened room, through what appears to be a mirror.

To take full advantage of the partially mirrored surface, the target side should be brightly lit, to obscure any hint of light coming through the glass from the viewer’s side. The darkened room is only completely obscured when it is in complete darkness. Sometimes a darkened curtain or a double door type vestibule is used to keep the viewer’s side darkened.

A flashlight held against the glass can be used to illuminate the darkened viewer’s side, allowing someone on the lit side to see through.  Two-way mirrors are used for:

  • providing security, through covert viewing of public spaces
  • for the protection of covert cameras
  • for some police interrogation rooms”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-05-13 13:41:13. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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END OF INTERVIEW

“Since Airl could read English very fluently, the Secretary asked if they could be allowed to observe for themselves while Airl read the transcripts, and verify that they were correct in writing.  They wanted her to write on a copy of the transcript whether the “translations” were correct, or not, and make a note of anything that was not accurate on the transcripts.  Of course, I had no choice but to obey orders and  I did exactly what the Secretary requested

I was given a copy of the transcripts, with a signature page, which I was to show to Airl.  After Airl completed her review, I was also directed to request that Airl sign the cover-page, attesting that all of the translations in the transcripts were correct, as amended by her.

About an hour later I entered the interview room, as instructed, with copies of the transcripts and signature page to deliver to Airl as the members of the gallery, including the Generals, (and Mr. Lindberg also, I presume) and others watched through the glass of the gallery room.

I went to my usual seat, sitting 4 or 5 feet across from Airl.  I presented the envelope of transcripts to Airl, and passed on the instructions I had received from the Secretary, telepathically.  Airl looked at me, and looked at the envelope, without accepting it.

Airl said: “If you have read them and they are accurate in your own estimation, there is no need for me to review them also.  The translations are correct.  You can tell your commander that you have faithfully conveyed a record of our communication.”

I assured Airl that I had read them, and they were exact recordings of everything I told the transcription typist.

“Will you sign the cover page then?”, I asked.

“No, I will not.”, said Airl.

“May I ask why not?”, I said.  I was a little confused as to why she wasn’t willing to do such a simple thing.

“If your commander does not trust his own staff to make an honest and accurate report to him, what confidence will my signature on the page give him?  Why will he trust an ink mark on a page made by an officer of The Domain, if he does not trust his own, loyal staff?”

I didn’t quite know what to say to that.  I couldn’t argue with Airl’s logic, and I couldn’t force her to sign the document either.  I sat in my chair for a minute wondering what to do next.  I thanked Airl and told her I needed to go ask my superiors for further instructions.  I placed the envelope of the transcripts in the inside breast pocket of my uniform jacket and began to rise from my chair.

At that moment the door from the gallery room slammed open!  Five heavily armed military police rushed into the room!   A man in a white laboratory coat followed closely behind them.  He pushed a small cart that carried a box-shaped machine with a lot of dials on the face of it.

Before I could react, two of the MPs grabbed Airl and held her firmly down in the overstuffed chair she had been sitting on since the first day of our interviews together.  The two other MPs grabbed my shoulders and pushed me back down on my chair and held me there.  The other MP stood directly in front of Airl, pointing a rifle directly at her, not more than six inches from her head.

The man in the lab coat quickly wheeled the cart behind Airl’s chair.  He deftly placed a circular head band over Airl’s head and turned back to the machine on the cart.  Suddenly, he shouted the word “clear!”

The soldiers who were holding Airl released her.  At that instant I saw Airl’s body stiffen and shudder.  This lasted for about 15 or 20 seconds.  The machine operator turned a knob on the machine and Airl’s body slumped back into the chair.  After a few seconds he turned the knob again and Airl’s body stiffened as before.  He repeated the same process several more times.

I sat in my chair, being held down all the while by the MPs.  And I didn’t understand what was going on.  I was terrified and transfixed by what was happening!  I couldn’t believe it!

After a few minutes several other men wearing white lab coats entered the room.  They briefly examined Airl who was now slumped listlessly in the chair.  They mumbled a few words to each other.  One of the men waved to the gallery window.  A gurney was immediately rolled into the room by two attendants.  These men lifted Airl’s limp body onto the gurney, strapped her down across her chest and arms, and rolled it out of the room.

I was immediately escorted out of the interview room by the MPs and taken directly to my quarters, where I was locked in my room with the MPs remaining at guard outside the door.

After about half an hour there was a knock at the  door to my quarters.  When I  opened it General Twining (EDITOR NOTE: SEE SPECIAL FOOTNOTE BELOW) entered, together with the machine operator in the white lab coat.  The General introduced the man to me as  Dr. Wilcox. [i] (Footnote). He asked me to accompany him and the doctor.  We left the room, followed by the MPs.  After several twists and turns through the complex we entered a small room where Airl had been wheeled on the gurney.

The General told me that Airl and The Domain were considered to be a very great military threat to the United States.  Airl had been “immobilized” so that she could not depart and return to her base, as she said she would do in the interview.  It would be a very grave risk to national security to allow Airl to report what she observed during her time at the base.  So, it had been determined that decisive action was needed to prevent this.

The General asked me if I understood why this was necessary.  I said that I did, although I most certainly did not agree that it was the least bit necessary and I certainly did not agree with the “surprise attack” on Airl and me in the interview room!   However, I said nothing about this to the General because I was very afraid of what might happen to me and Airl if I protested.

Dr. Wilcox asked me to approach the gurney and stand next to Airl.  Airl lay perfectly still and unmoving on the bed.  I could not tell whether she was alive or dead.  Several other men in white lab coats, who I assumed were also doctors, stood on the opposite side of the bed.  They had connected two pieces of monitoring equipment to Airl’s head, arms and chest.  One of these devices I recognized from my training as a surgical nurse as an EEG machine [ii] (Footnote) which is used to detect electrical activity in the brain.  The other device was a normal hospital room vital signs monitor, which I knew would be useless since Airl did not have a biological body.

Dr. Wilcox explained to me that he had administered a series of “mild” electroshocks  to Airl in an attempt to subdue her long enough to allow the military authorities time to evaluate the situation and determine what to do with Airl.

He asked me to attempt to communicate with Airl, telepathically.

I tried for several minutes but couldn’t sense any communication from Airl.  I couldn’t even sense whether Airl was present in the body any longer!

“I think you must have killed her”, I said to the doctor.”

— Excerpted from Notes provided by Nurse Matilda MacElroy, published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW, edited by Lawrence R. Spencer

FOOTNOTES:

EDITOR’S SPECIAL FOOTNOTE REGARDING GENERAL TWINNING, COURTESY OF WWW.AFTERDISCLOSURE.COM:  “September 23, 1947 is the day a top U.S. General said, in writing, that UFOs were real.

Right at the beginning of the “modern” UFO era — three months after Kenneth Arnold and two months after Roswell — General Nathan Twining, Head of the U.S. Air Materiel Command (AMC), wrote a classified letter to Air Force General George Schulgen regarding the “flying discs.” He said the objects were “real and not visionary or fictitious.”

Twining memo

[i] “…Dr. Wilcox…”

Paul h. Wilcox, M. D. The Traverse City State Hospital, Traverse City, Michigan.

Is the author of the following article, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in August of 1947:

“A Review of Over 23,000 Treatments Using Unidirectional Currents

1. Forty percent of the most chronic patients showed significant improvement in ward behavior if adequately and repeatedly treated with suitable type of electroshock therapy. Relapses must be treated whenever they occur over months and years.

2. At least 60% of early cases, aged 60 or under, were rehabilitated within 1 year when adequately treated and 65% by the end of the second year after the start of treatment.

3. Adequate treatment means intensive treatment until the expected improvement has occurred and intensive treatment of relapses when they occur. No patient, otherwise suitable who still is not rehabilitated after 1 year, has had an adequate trial of treatment with less than 20 treatments.

4. An ideal therapy is one which achieves beneficial results without causing accumulating brain damage, thus permitting its use repeatedly for years if necessary.

5. This ideal is approached by the relatively low intensity 60-cycle pulsating direct current used in the treatment of the patients reviewed in this paper. This technique also has been accompanied by an exceptionally low percentage of skeletal complications.”

— Reference:  American Journal of Psychiatry 104:100-112, August 1947, doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.104.2.100 © 1947 American Psychiatric Association

[ii] “…Electroencephalograph…”

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the measurement of electrical activity produced by the brain as recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp. (EEG) is the measurement of electrical activity produced by the brain as recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp.

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-04-17 23:12:26. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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