Tag Archives: Dr. Wilcox

DELUSIONAL RANTING OF A MERE WOMAN

“Dr. Wilcox explained to me that he had administered a series of “mild” electroshocks  to Airl in an attempt to subdue her long enough to allow the military authorities time to evaluate the situation and determine what to do with Airl.

He asked me to attempt to communicate with Airl, telepathically.

I tried for several minutes but couldn’t sense any communication from Airl.  I couldn’t even sense whether Airl was present in the body any longer!

“I think you must have killed her”, I said to the doctor.

Dr. Wilcox told me that they would keep Airl under observation and that I would be asked to return later to try to establish communication with Airl again.”

“The next morning I was escorted from my quarters, under the guard of four MPs, to the interview room.  Airl’s overstuffed chair had been removed from the room and replaced by a small desk and several office chairs.  I was asked to sit down and wait to be interviewed.  After a few minutes Dr. Wilcox came into the office together with another man wearing a plain business suit.  The man introduced himself as John Reid.

[i] (Footnote)

Dr. Wilcox explained to me that Mr. Reid had been flown in from Chicago at the request of my superior officers to conduct a lie detector [ii] (Footnote) test on me!  My surprise at this statement was so obvious, that Dr. Wilcox noticed that I was obviously taken aback, and insulted, at the insinuation that I had ever lied about anything!

Nonetheless, Mr. Reid began to set up his polygraph device on the desk next to my chair, while Dr. Wilcox continued to explain, in a calm voice, that the test was being administered for my own protection.  Since all of the interviews with the alien had been conducted telepathically, and Airl had declined to read and attest that the typed transcripts were accurate, the truth and accuracy of the statements contained in the transcripts depended entirely on my personal word alone.  There was no other reliable way to test the accuracy of the transcripts without submitting me to a battery of tests and psychological examinations to determine, in the opinion of “experts”,  meaning himself, whether the transcripts should be taken seriously, or not.

The tone of his voice said very clearly, “or dismissed as the delusional ranting of a mere woman!”

Mr. Reid proceeded to strap a rubber tube around my chest, as well as an ordinary blood-pressure cuff around my upper arm.  He then placed electrodes on the fingers and surfaces of my hands.  He explained that he would be very objective during the interview because he had been thoroughly trained in scientific interrogation.  This training was supposed to make his interrogation free from human error.

Mr. Reid explained to me that, in response to the questions he and Dr. Wilcox were going to ask me, that actual physiological changes would be transmitted through a small panel unit.  The readings would then be tracked on moving graph paper, which he placed beside the machine on the desk.  The parallel graphs on the paper would then be correlated and interpreted by Mr. Reid, with the “expert” assistance of Dr. Wilcox, to determine whether or not I was lying.”

— Excerpted from the Top Secret transcripts published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW, edited by Lawrence R. Spencer


FOOTNOTES:

[i] “…introduced himself as Mr. John Reid …” John Edward Reid, American criminologist developed a Polygraph in 1945 which was a scientific recording device designed to register a person’s bodily responses to being questioned. Popularly known as a lie detector, the polygraph has been used chiefly in criminal investigations, although it is also used in employment and security screening practices. Because no machine can unerringly recognize when a person is lying, the polygraph results are used in conjunction with other evidence, observations, and information. Emotional stress reflected by this test, for instance, need not be due to lying. On the other hand, a subject may be a pathological liar and therefore show no measurable bodily responses when giving false answers. Ordinary nervousness, individual physical or mental abnormalities, discomfort, excessive pretest interrogation, or indifference to a question also affect test accuracy. The polygraph can, however, provide a basis for an evaluation of whether or not the subject’s answers are truthful. This test has also been helpful in exonerating innocent persons accused of crimes. A polygraph is actually several instruments combined to simultaneously record changes in blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. The electrical conductivity of the skin’s surface can also be measured—increased sweat-gland activity reduces the skin’s ability to carry electrical current.” — Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[ii] “…lie detector testing…”
“Dr. William Moulton Marston  (May 9, 1893 – May 2, 1947) was an American psychologist, feminist theorist, inventor, and comic book author who created the character Wonder Woman. Two strong women, his wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston and Olive Byrne, (who lived with the couple in a polyamorous relationship), served as exemplars for the character and greatly influenced her creation. Dr. William Moulton Marston is credited as the creator of the systolic blood-pressure test used in an attempt to detect deception, which became one component of the modern polygraph. According to their son, Marston’s wife, Elizabeth Holloway Marston, was also involved in the development of the systolic blood-pressure test: “According to Marston’s son, it was his mother Elizabeth, Marston’s wife, who suggested to him that ‘When she got mad or excited, her blood pressure seemed to climb’. This would be the basis for Wonder Woman’s Lasso of Truth. The FBI considered William Moulton Marston, who invented the lie detector and created the comic book character Wonder Woman under the pseudonym Charles Moulton, to be a ‘phony’ and a ‘crackpot.’ He is alleged to have misrepresented the result of a study he conducted for the Gillette razor company in 1938, for which he reportedly received some $30,000, a handsome sum in those days. Despite these misgivings, the FBI today uses Marston’s creation (the polygraph, not the Lasso of Truth) to guide investigations as well as to screen applicants and employees.” — Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-04-28 14:23:40. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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END OF INTERVIEW

“Since Airl could read English very fluently, the Secretary asked if they could be allowed to observe for themselves while Airl read the transcripts, and verify that they were correct in writing.  They wanted her to write on a copy of the transcript whether the “translations” were correct, or not, and make a note of anything that was not accurate on the transcripts.  Of course, I had no choice but to obey orders and  I did exactly what the Secretary requested

I was given a copy of the transcripts, with a signature page, which I was to show to Airl.  After Airl completed her review, I was also directed to request that Airl sign the cover-page, attesting that all of the translations in the transcripts were correct, as amended by her.

About an hour later I entered the interview room, as instructed, with copies of the transcripts and signature page to deliver to Airl as the members of the gallery, including the Generals, (and Mr. Lindberg also, I presume) and others watched through the glass of the gallery room.

I went to my usual seat, sitting 4 or 5 feet across from Airl.  I presented the envelope of transcripts to Airl, and passed on the instructions I had received from the Secretary, telepathically.  Airl looked at me, and looked at the envelope, without accepting it.

Airl said: “If you have read them and they are accurate in your own estimation, there is no need for me to review them also.  The translations are correct.  You can tell your commander that you have faithfully conveyed a record of our communication.”

I assured Airl that I had read them, and they were exact recordings of everything I told the transcription typist.

“Will you sign the cover page then?”, I asked.

“No, I will not.”, said Airl.

“May I ask why not?”, I said.  I was a little confused as to why she wasn’t willing to do such a simple thing.

“If your commander does not trust his own staff to make an honest and accurate report to him, what confidence will my signature on the page give him?  Why will he trust an ink mark on a page made by an officer of The Domain, if he does not trust his own, loyal staff?”

I didn’t quite know what to say to that.  I couldn’t argue with Airl’s logic, and I couldn’t force her to sign the document either.  I sat in my chair for a minute wondering what to do next.  I thanked Airl and told her I needed to go ask my superiors for further instructions.  I placed the envelope of the transcripts in the inside breast pocket of my uniform jacket and began to rise from my chair.

At that moment the door from the gallery room slammed open!  Five heavily armed military police rushed into the room!   A man in a white laboratory coat followed closely behind them.  He pushed a small cart that carried a box-shaped machine with a lot of dials on the face of it.

Before I could react, two of the MPs grabbed Airl and held her firmly down in the overstuffed chair she had been sitting on since the first day of our interviews together.  The two other MPs grabbed my shoulders and pushed me back down on my chair and held me there.  The other MP stood directly in front of Airl, pointing a rifle directly at her, not more than six inches from her head.

The man in the lab coat quickly wheeled the cart behind Airl’s chair.  He deftly placed a circular head band over Airl’s head and turned back to the machine on the cart.  Suddenly, he shouted the word “clear!”

The soldiers who were holding Airl released her.  At that instant I saw Airl’s body stiffen and shudder.  This lasted for about 15 or 20 seconds.  The machine operator turned a knob on the machine and Airl’s body slumped back into the chair.  After a few seconds he turned the knob again and Airl’s body stiffened as before.  He repeated the same process several more times.

I sat in my chair, being held down all the while by the MPs.  And I didn’t understand what was going on.  I was terrified and transfixed by what was happening!  I couldn’t believe it!

After a few minutes several other men wearing white lab coats entered the room.  They briefly examined Airl who was now slumped listlessly in the chair.  They mumbled a few words to each other.  One of the men waved to the gallery window.  A gurney was immediately rolled into the room by two attendants.  These men lifted Airl’s limp body onto the gurney, strapped her down across her chest and arms, and rolled it out of the room.

I was immediately escorted out of the interview room by the MPs and taken directly to my quarters, where I was locked in my room with the MPs remaining at guard outside the door.

After about half an hour there was a knock at the  door to my quarters.  When I  opened it General Twining (EDITOR NOTE: SEE SPECIAL FOOTNOTE BELOW) entered, together with the machine operator in the white lab coat.  The General introduced the man to me as  Dr. Wilcox. [i] (Footnote). He asked me to accompany him and the doctor.  We left the room, followed by the MPs.  After several twists and turns through the complex we entered a small room where Airl had been wheeled on the gurney.

The General told me that Airl and The Domain were considered to be a very great military threat to the United States.  Airl had been “immobilized” so that she could not depart and return to her base, as she said she would do in the interview.  It would be a very grave risk to national security to allow Airl to report what she observed during her time at the base.  So, it had been determined that decisive action was needed to prevent this.

The General asked me if I understood why this was necessary.  I said that I did, although I most certainly did not agree that it was the least bit necessary and I certainly did not agree with the “surprise attack” on Airl and me in the interview room!   However, I said nothing about this to the General because I was very afraid of what might happen to me and Airl if I protested.

Dr. Wilcox asked me to approach the gurney and stand next to Airl.  Airl lay perfectly still and unmoving on the bed.  I could not tell whether she was alive or dead.  Several other men in white lab coats, who I assumed were also doctors, stood on the opposite side of the bed.  They had connected two pieces of monitoring equipment to Airl’s head, arms and chest.  One of these devices I recognized from my training as a surgical nurse as an EEG machine [ii] (Footnote) which is used to detect electrical activity in the brain.  The other device was a normal hospital room vital signs monitor, which I knew would be useless since Airl did not have a biological body.

Dr. Wilcox explained to me that he had administered a series of “mild” electroshocks  to Airl in an attempt to subdue her long enough to allow the military authorities time to evaluate the situation and determine what to do with Airl.

He asked me to attempt to communicate with Airl, telepathically.

I tried for several minutes but couldn’t sense any communication from Airl.  I couldn’t even sense whether Airl was present in the body any longer!

“I think you must have killed her”, I said to the doctor.”

— Excerpted from Notes provided by Nurse Matilda MacElroy, published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW, edited by Lawrence R. Spencer

FOOTNOTES:

EDITOR’S SPECIAL FOOTNOTE REGARDING GENERAL TWINNING, COURTESY OF WWW.AFTERDISCLOSURE.COM:  “September 23, 1947 is the day a top U.S. General said, in writing, that UFOs were real.

Right at the beginning of the “modern” UFO era — three months after Kenneth Arnold and two months after Roswell — General Nathan Twining, Head of the U.S. Air Materiel Command (AMC), wrote a classified letter to Air Force General George Schulgen regarding the “flying discs.” He said the objects were “real and not visionary or fictitious.”

Twining memo

[i] “…Dr. Wilcox…”

Paul h. Wilcox, M. D. The Traverse City State Hospital, Traverse City, Michigan.

Is the author of the following article, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in August of 1947:

“A Review of Over 23,000 Treatments Using Unidirectional Currents

1. Forty percent of the most chronic patients showed significant improvement in ward behavior if adequately and repeatedly treated with suitable type of electroshock therapy. Relapses must be treated whenever they occur over months and years.

2. At least 60% of early cases, aged 60 or under, were rehabilitated within 1 year when adequately treated and 65% by the end of the second year after the start of treatment.

3. Adequate treatment means intensive treatment until the expected improvement has occurred and intensive treatment of relapses when they occur. No patient, otherwise suitable who still is not rehabilitated after 1 year, has had an adequate trial of treatment with less than 20 treatments.

4. An ideal therapy is one which achieves beneficial results without causing accumulating brain damage, thus permitting its use repeatedly for years if necessary.

5. This ideal is approached by the relatively low intensity 60-cycle pulsating direct current used in the treatment of the patients reviewed in this paper. This technique also has been accompanied by an exceptionally low percentage of skeletal complications.”

— Reference:  American Journal of Psychiatry 104:100-112, August 1947, doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.104.2.100 © 1947 American Psychiatric Association

[ii] “…Electroencephalograph…”

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the measurement of electrical activity produced by the brain as recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp. (EEG) is the measurement of electrical activity produced by the brain as recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp.

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-04-17 23:12:26. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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