Tag Archives: Otter


“Evolution by natural selection is science fiction.  One species does not accidentally, or randomly evolve to become another species, as the Earth textbooks indicate, without manipulation of genetic material by an IS-BE.

A simple example of IS-BE intervention is the selective breeding of a species on Earth.  Within the past few hundred years several hundred dog breeds and hundreds of varieties of pigeons and dozens of Koi fish have been “evolved” in just a few years, beginning with only one original breed.  Without active intervention by IS-BEs, biological organisms rarely change.

The development of an animal like the ‘duck-billed platypus’ required a lot of very clever engineering to combine the body of a beaver with the bill of a duck and make a mammal that lays eggs.  Undoubtedly, some wealthy client placed a “special order” for it as a gift or curious amusement.  I am sure the laboratory of some biotechnical company worked on it for years to make it a self-replicating life form!

The notion that the creation of any life form could have resulted from a coincidental chemical interaction moldering up from some primordial ooze is beyond absurdity!”

— Excerpted from the transcripts published in the book, Alien Interview



“The Duck-billed Platypus is an egg-laying, venomous, duck-billed, beaver-tailed, otter-footed mammal.  Both male and female Platypus are born with ankle spurs, only the male has spurs which produce a cocktail of venom powerful enough to kill smaller animals such as dogs.  When the Platypus was first discovered by Europeans in 1798, a pelt and sketch were sent back to the United Kingdom by Captain John Hunter, the second Governor of New South Wales. The British scientists were at first convinced that the attributes must have been a hoax.  George Shaw, who produced the first description of the animal in the Naturalist’s Miscellany in 1799, stated that it was impossible not to entertain doubts as to its genuine nature, and Robert Knox believed it may have been produced by some Asian taxidermist.  It was thought that somebody had sewn a duck’s beak onto the body of a beaver-like animal. Shaw even took a pair of scissors to the dried skin to check for stitches.”

— Reference Source: Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-05-18 12:37:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter