Category Archives: US Military

BRASS AT THE BASE

File:Roswell AAF sign - 1946.jpg

“Shortly after I finished recounting the previous interview with Airl to the stenographer, I was summoned urgently to the office of the Commanding Officer of the base.  I was escorted by four heavily armed military policemen.  When I arrived, I was asked to be seated in a very large, make-shift office that had been arranged with a conference table and chairs.  In the office were several dignitaries I had seen at various times in “the gallery”.   I recognized a few of them because they were famous men.

I was introduced to these men, which included:

Army Air Force Secretary Symington, [i] (Footnote) General Nathan Twining,

[ii] (Footnote) General Jimmy Doolittle , [iii] (Footnote) General Vandenberg, [iv] (Footnote) and General Norstad. [v] (Footnote)

Much to my surprise Charles Lindbergh [vi] (Footnote) was also in the office.  Secretary Symington explained to me that Mr. Lindberg was there as a consultant to the chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force.  There were several other men present in the room who were not introduced.  I assume these men were personal aides to the officers or agents of some intelligence service.

All of this sudden attention, not only from the Secretary and generals, but from such world famous people as Mr. Lindbergh, and General Doolittle, made me realize how critically important my role as an “interpreter” for Airl was, as seen through the eyes of others.  Until this time I was not really aware of this except in an peripheral sense. I suppose this was because I was so absorbed in details of the extraordinary situation.  Suddenly, I began to grasp the magnitude of my role.  I think that the presence of these men in that meeting was intended, in part, to impress me with this fact!

The Secretary instructed me not to be nervous.  He said that I was not in any trouble.  He asked me if I thought the alien would be willing to answer a list of questions they had prepared.  He explained that they were very eager to discover many more details about Airl, the flying disc, The Domain, and many other subjects that Airl had disclosed in the interview transcripts.  Of course, they were mainly interested in questions relating to the military security and the construction of the flying disc.”

—  Excerpted from the Personal Notes of Matilda MacElroy, published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW, edited by Lawrence R. Spencer
FOOTNOTES: 


[i] “…General Symington,”…

His first positions were chairman of the Surplus Property Board (1945), administrator of the Property Administration (1945–1946) and Assistant Secretary of War for Air (1946–1947). On September 18, 1947, the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force was created and Symington became the first Secretary.  Symington once formally requested a report from military sources regarding the possible existence of subterranean super humans.

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

[ii] “…General Nathan Twining, …”

He was named commander of the Air Materiel Command, and in 1947 he took over Alaskan Air Command.  In 1947, Twining was asked to study UFO reports; he recommended that a formal study of the phenomenon take place; Project Sign was the result. When Hoyt Vandenberg retired in mid-1953, Twining was selected as chief; during his tenure, massive retaliation based on airpower became the national strategy.  In 1957, President Eisenhower appointed Twining chairman of the Joint Chiefs.

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

 

 

 

Lt. General James Doolittle, head and shoulders.jpg[iii] “… General Jimmy Doolittle, …”

“Soon after the attack on Pearl Harbor and the US entry into World War II, Doolittle was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on January 2, 1942, and went to Headquarters Army Air Force to plan the first aerial raid on the Japanese homeland. He volunteered and received Gen. H.H. Arnold’s approval to lead the attack of 16 B-25 medium bombers from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet, with targets in Tokyo, Kobe, Osaka, and Nagoya. It was the first and only combat mission of his military career.

Doolittle received the Medal of Honor, presented by President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the White House, for planning and leading the successful operation. The Doolittle Raid is viewed by historians as a major public-relations victory for the United States. Although the amount of damage done to Japanese war industry was minor, the raid showed the Japanese their homeland was not invulnerable.

Doolittle was portrayed by Spencer Tracy in the 1944 film Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo and by Alec Baldwin in the 2001 film Pearl Harbor, in which the Doolittle raid was depicted.

On May 10, 1946, Doolittle reverted to inactive reserve status and returned to Shell Oil as a vice president, and later as a director.  He was the highest-ranking reserve officer to serve in the U.S. military in World War II.”

EDITOR —

In March 1951, he was appointed a special assistant to the Air Force chief of staff, serving as a civilian in scientific matters which led to Air Force ballistic missile and space programs. (?!)

“He retired from Air Force duty on February 28, 1959 but continued to serve his country as Chairman of the Board of Space Technology Laboratories.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Hoyt Vandenberg[iv] “…General Vandenberg…”

Lieutenant General Vandenberg was designated vice chief of staff of the Air Force on October 1, 1947, and promoted to the rank of General.

— Reference: Wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

Lauris Norstad NATO photo.jpg[v] “… General Norstad…”

“On October 1, 1947, following the division of the War Department into the Departments of The Army and The Air Force, General Norstad was appointed deputy chief of staff for operations of the Air Force.”

— Reference: Wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

 

[vi] “… Charles Lindbergh was also in the office…”

“Charles Lindbergh gained sudden great international fame as the first pilot to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. He flew from Roosevelt Airfield in Garden City, New York, to Paris (Le Bourget Airport) on 20 May – 21 May 1927 in 33.5 hours. His plane was the single-engine aircraft, The Spirit of St. Louis.

Lindbergh’s accomplishment won him the Orteig Prize; more significant than the prize money was the acclaim that resulted from his daring flight. A ticker-tape parade was held for him down 5th Avenue in New York City on 13 June 1927.

His public stature following this flight was such that he became an important voice on behalf of aviation activities, including the central committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in the United States. The massive publicity surrounding him and his flight boosted the aircraft industry and made a skeptical public take air travel seriously. Lindbergh is recognized in aviation for demonstrating and charting polar air-routes, high altitude flying techniques, and increasing aircraft flying range by decreasing fuel consumption. These innovations are the basis of modern intercontinental air travel.

In his six months during WW II in the Pacific in 1944, Lindbergh took part in fighter bomber raids on Japanese positions, flying about 50 combat missions (as a civilian). The U.S. Marine and Army Air Force pilots who served with Lindbergh admired and respected him, praising his courage and defending his patriotism.

After World War II he lived quietly in Connecticut as a consultant both to the chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force and to Pan American World Airways. His 1953 book The Spirit of St. Louis, recounting his non-stop transatlantic flight, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1954.

Dwight D. Eisenhower restored Lindbergh’s assignment with the Army Air Corps and made him a Brigadier General in 1954. In that year, he served on the Congressional advisory panel set up to establish the site of the United States Air Force Academy. In December 1968, he visited the crew of Apollo 8 on the eve of the first manned spaceflight to leave earth orbit.

From the 1960s on, Lindbergh became an advocate for the conservation of the natural world, campaigning to protect endangered species like humpback and blue whales, was instrumental in establishing protections for the “primitive” Filipino group the Tasaday and African tribes, and supporting the establishment of a national park. While studying the native flora and fauna of the Philippines, he also became involved in an effort to protect the Philippine eagle.

In his final years, Lindbergh became troubled that the world was out of balance with its natural environment; he stressed the need to regain that balance, and spoke against the introduction of supersonic airliners.

Lindbergh’s speeches and writings later in life emphasized his love of both technology and nature, and a lifelong belief that “all the achievements of mankind have value only to the extent that they preserve and improve the quality of life.”

In a 1967 Life magazine article, he said, “The human future depends on our ability to combine the knowledge of science with the wisdom of wildness.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-04-15 16:02:01. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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WE WERE WARNED

 

“These documents contain information which is quite relevant to your interest and investigations into alien encounters and paranormal experience. To use your analogy in “The Oz Factors” book, I can honestly say that the few factual reports that have been made by others about “alien” influences are only a gentle breeze in the eye of an Apocalyptic Hurricane swirling around Earth.  There really are wizards and wicked witches and flying monkeys in this universe!

This information, which has been suspected and/or speculated upon by so many for so long, has been constantly denied by mainstream media, academia, and the Military-Industrial Complex that President Eisenhower warned us about in his farewell address.”

— Excerpted from one of the letters written by Nurse Matilda MacElroy, published in the book, Alien Interview

FOOTNOTE:

President of the United States (and former General of the Army) Dwight D. Eisenhower used the term in his Farewell Address to the Nation on January 17, 1961:

“A vital element in keeping the peace is our military establishment. Our arms must be mighty, ready for instant action, so that no potential aggressor may be tempted to risk his own destruction….  This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence — economic, political, even spiritual — is felt in every city, every statehouse, every office of the federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society. In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals so that security and liberty may prosper together.”

In the penultimate draft of the address, Eisenhower initially used the term military-industrial-congressional complex, and thus indicated the essential role that the United States Congress plays in the propagation of the military industry. But, it is said, that the president chose to strike the word congressional in order to placate members of the legislative branch of the federal government.

— REFERENCE SOURCE: WikiPedia.org

 

Originally posted 2011-07-09 12:59:49. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY EDUCATION

“By the 15th day after “rescuing” Airl from the crash site, I was able to communicate fluidly and effortlessly with her in English.  She had absorbed so much written material by this time that her academic education far exceeded my own.  Although I graduated from high school in Los Angeles in 1940 and attended college for four years of premedical and nursing training, the variety of my own reading had been  fairly limited.

I had not studied most of the subjects to which Airl had now been exposed, especially considering her acute understanding, very intense study habits and a nearly photographic memory!  She was able to recall long passages from books she read.  She was especially fond of sections of her favorite stories from classic literature like The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn [i] (Footnote), tales from Gulliver’s Travels [ii] (Footnote) and Peter Pan [iii] (Footnote) and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow [iv] (Footnote).

By this time Airl had become the teacher, and I was the student.  I was about to learn what men of Earth do not know and have no way of knowing!

The throng of scientists and agents who observed us through the one-way glass [v] (Footnote) of our interview room, whom Airl and I now referred to as “the gallery”, were growing increasingly impatient to ask her questions.  But Airl continued to refuse to allow any questions to be asked of her by anyone other than myself, even vicariously through me as an interpreter, or in writing.

On the afternoon of the 16th day Airl and I sat next to each other as she read.  She closed the last page of a book she was reading and placed it aside.  I was about to hand her the next book from a large pile waiting to be read, when she turned and said or “thought” to me, “I am ready to speak now”.  At first I was a little confused by the remark.  I gestured for her to continue and she began to teach me my first lesson.”

— Excerpted from the notes provided by Nurse Matilda MacElroy published in the book ALIEN INTERVIEW, edited by Lawrence R. Spencer


FOOTNOTES:

[i] “… Adventures of Huckleberry Finn…”

“Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) (often shortened to Huck Finn) by Mark Twain.  The book is noted for its innocent young protagonist, its colorful description of people and places along the Mississippi River, and its sober and often scathing look at entrenched attitudes, particularly racism. The drifting journey of Huckleberry Finn and his friend, runaway slave Jim, down the Mississippi River on their raft may be one of the most enduring images of escape and freedom in all of American literature.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[ii] “… Gulliver’s Travels …”

“Gulliver’s Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of several Ships, is a novel by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the “travellers’ tales” literary sub-genre. It is Swift’s best known full-length work, and a classic of English literature.  The book became tremendously popular as soon as it was published (John Gay said in a 1726 letter to Swift that “it is universally read, from the cabinet council to the nursery”), and it is likely that it has never been out of print since then.  The book presents itself as a simple traveller’s narrative with the disingenuous title Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, its authorship assigned only to “Lemuel Gulliver, first a surgeon, then a captain of several ships”.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[iii] “…Peter Pan…”

Peter Pan is a character created by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie (1860–1937). A mischievous boy who flies and magically refuses to grow up, Peter Pan spends his never-ending childhood adventuring on the small island of Neverland as the leader of his gang the Lost Boys, interacting with fairies and pirates, and from time to time meeting ordinary children from the world outside.

Barrie never described Peter’s appearance in detail, leaving much of it to the imagination of the reader and the interpretation of anyone adapting the character. He describes him as a beautiful boy with a beautiful smile, “clad in skeleton leaves and the juices that flow from trees”.

Peter is mainly an exaggerated stereotype of a boastful and careless boy. He is quick to point out how great he is.  Peter has a nonchalant, devil-may-care attitude, and is fearlessly cocky when it comes to putting himself in danger. Barrie writes that when Peter thought he was going to die on Marooner’s Rock, he felt scared, yet he felt only one shudder run through him when any other person would’ve felt scared up until death. With his blissful unawareness of the tragedy of death, he says, “To die will be an awfully big adventure”.

Peter’s archetypal ability is his refusal to grow up. Barrie did not explain how he was able to do this, leaving the implication that it was by an act of will.

Peter is a skilled swordsman, with the skill to rival even Captain Hook, whose hand he cut off in a duel. He has remarkably keen vision and hearing.  Peter Pan is said to be able to do almost anything.   Peter has an effect on the whole of Neverland and its inhabitants when he is there. Barrie states that the island wakes up when he returns from his trip to London.   Peter is the leader of the Lost Boys, a band of boys who were lost by their parents, and came to live in Neverland. He is friends with Tinker Bell, a common fairy who is often jealously protective of him.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[iv] “…The Legend of Sleepy Hollow… ”

“A short story by Washington Irving contained in his collection The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent., written while he was living in Birmingham, England, and first published in 1820. With Irving’s companion piece “Rip Van Winkle”, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” is among the earliest American fiction still read today.

The story is set circa 1790 in the Dutch settlement of Tarry Town, New York, in a secluded glen called Sleepy Hollow. It tells the story of Ichabod Crane, a lanky schoolmaster from Connecticut, who competes with Abraham “Brom Bones” Van Brunt, the town rowdy, for the hand of 18-year-old Katrina Van Tassel, only daughter of a wealthy farmer. As Crane leaves a party at the Van Tassel home on an autumn night, he is pursued by the Headless Horseman, supposedly the ghost of a Hessian trooper who lost his head to a cannonball during “some nameless battle” of the American Revolutionary War and who “rides forth to the scene of battle in nightly quest of his head.” Crane disappears from town, leaving Katrina to marry Brom Bones, who was “to look exceedingly knowing whenever the story of Ichabod was related.”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

[v] ...one-way glass…”

A two-way mirror, also called a one-way mirror, is a mirror which is partially reflective and partially transparent. It is used with a darkened room on one side and a well-lit room on the other, allowing those in the darkened room to see into the lighted room but not vice versa.

The glass is coated with (or in some cases encases a layer of) a very thin almost transparent layer of metal (generally aluminum). The result is what appears to be a mirror from one side, and tinted glass from the other. A viewer in the brightly lit area has difficulty seeing into the darkened room, through what appears to be a mirror.

To take full advantage of the partially mirrored surface, the target side should be brightly lit, to obscure any hint of light coming through the glass from the viewer’s side. The darkened room is only completely obscured when it is in complete darkness. Sometimes a darkened curtain or a double door type vestibule is used to keep the viewer’s side darkened.

A flashlight held against the glass can be used to illuminate the darkened viewer’s side, allowing someone on the lit side to see through.  Two-way mirrors are used for:

  • providing security, through covert viewing of public spaces
  • for the protection of covert cameras
  • for some police interrogation rooms”

— Reference:  Wikipedia.org

Originally posted 2011-05-13 13:41:13. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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